Maintenance, Repair, Overhaul (Suitcase/Pickup Truck) Mechanic Temporary Permit


The Augusta Municipal Airport (AMA) has adopted a permitting process for mechanics that do not have an established, commercial presence on the field, commonly referred to as “suitcase” or “pickup truck” mechanics.

While AMA is fortunate to have two established maintenance shops (Kansas Copters & Wings and Hodge Aviation), we recognize that from time to time, an aircraft owner may require specialized maintenance services not offered on the field. If aircraft owners are unable to fly their aircraft to their preferred mechanic, and the maintenance service is not available on the field, owners currently do not have a good option for allowing a 3rd party, non-established mechanic to come onto the field to perform the needed emergency repairs or maintenance without violating their lease agreement and the airport’s rules and regulations policy, both of which follow the FAA’s Airport Compliance Manual.

Currently, aircraft owners/operators can:

  1. Fly the aircraft to their preferred mechanic, or
  2. Perform their own preventative maintenance as outlined in accordance with FAR Part 43, or
  3. Perform any maintenance using their own equipment and regular employees, or
  4. Take the aircraft to one of the approved, on-field maintenance shops.
None of the above rights will change.

The temporary permit process allows a non-established mechanic to apply for temporary access to perform specific repairs on a specific aircraft, during a specific timeframe at AMA, provided they apply and are approved for the permit, pay the permit fee, and operate under the same conditions and requirements as the on-field maintenance shops (such as insurance, environmental, safety and security).

Why did AMA adopt this permitting process? Without a permitting process, aircraft owners would violate lease agreements if they had mechanics working on their aircraft at AMA, regardless of the work.

The on-field MROs have invested in their operation at AMA, have generated revenue and activity at the airport, and have insurance, environmental, safety, and security requirements within their lease.
If AMA were to look the other way when aircraft owners brought suitcase mechanics onto the field, AMA would violate Federal Grant Assurances for economic nondiscrimination. Siphoning business away from those MROs that have invested in the airport would not be in the airport’s interest and would make AMA less attractive for commercial development. Allowing someone to provide a service at the airport without requiring insurance opens the airport and City of Augusta up to liability, especially in today’s litigious society.

At the end of the day, AMA is trying to provide additional options to aircraft owners while safeguarding the airport’s interests.

Permit application can be downloaded here: